Music Calendar

The Maison features live music every day. Live bands start at 4PM every day and 1pm on Saturday. We feature traditional Jazz music daily during dinner until 10PM. At night, local brass and funk bands and top national touring acts rock the dance floor from 2 stages. ALL SHOWS ARE FREE UNLESS OTHERWISE SPECIFIED!

Apr
25
Tue
McKenna Alicia
Apr 25 @ 4:00 PM – 6:30 PM
Gregory Agid Quartet
Apr 25 @ 6:30 PM – 9:30 PM

Trad jazz clarinetist Greg Agid got his New Orleans start at the Louis Armstrong Jazz Camp, being mentored by luminaries like Alvin Batiste and Kidd Jordan. Infusing the rhythms and sounds of the musicians that have gone before him with his personal experiences and tastes, Agid sees himself as part of the great musical continuum that is New Orleans. His mission is to move the sound to its logical next step while delighting audiences throughout the city with his sprightly, effervescent clarinet performances. He takes the stage with his quartet every Tuesday at Maison on Frenchmen, plus appearing with Delfeayo Marsalis’s Uptown Jazz Orchestra at Snug Harbor on Wednesdays. He’s also a frequent guest at the Spotted Cat and Mimi’s in the Marigny.

BrassLightning
Apr 25 @ 9:30 PM
Apr
26
Wed
Heather Holloway & The Heebie Jeebies
Apr 26 @ 4:00 PM – 6:30 PM
The New Orleans Jazz Vipers
Apr 26 @ 6:30 PM – 9:30 PM

In 2009, the original New Orleans Jazz Vipers morphed into two new bands, Joe Braun’s The New Orleans Jazz Vipers and the New Orleans Cottonmouth Kings featuring six former Jazz Vipers. You can hear both bands playing regularly on Frenchmen Street in New Orleans, and both have released new CDs available at their websites.

The original New Orleans Jazz Vipers were a popular and active band in New Orleans for many years, pioneers of the Frenchmen Street scene, with a twice-weekly residency at the Spotted Cat 2003 to 2009. Noteable festival appearances included the Jazz Fest, French Quarter Fest, Lincoln Center Midsummer Night Swing and the Monterey Jazz Festival (in September 2005). Part of the unique sound of the Jazz Vipers came from the fact that they rarely used any amplification. The sound of the band was at the same time retro, full of energy and unpretentious, with both up-tempo dance numbers and well-chosen ballads; it has been aptly described as neo-trad-jazz. The band received many awards in Louisiana including the Gambit’s “Big Easy” award in 2005 for “Best Traditional Jazz Band,” and Offbeat Magazine’s “Best of the Beat” award in 2004 for “Best Traditional Jazz Album” (for the album “Live on Frenchmen Street”). In 2001 and 2003 they won the “Best of the Beat” award for “Best Emerging Traditional Jazz Band.”

 

RESERVE A TABLE FOR THIS SHOW!
Danny Abel & Friends
Apr 26 @ 9:30 PM
Apr
27
Thu
Tuba Skinny
Apr 27 @ 4:00 PM – 7:00 PM
The Good For Nothin’ Band
Apr 27 @ 7:00 PM – 10:00 PM
The Original Stanton Moore Trio ft. Robert Walter/Will Bernard & Special Guests
Apr 27 @ 9:30 PM – Apr 28 @ 4:00 AM
The Original Stanton Moore Trio ft. Robert Walter/Will Bernard & Special Guests @ The Maison | New Orleans | LA | US

Boom Boom Room Presents 

The Original Stanton Moore Trio & Special Guests 

featuring: 

Stanton Moore – Drums/Galactic

Robert Walter- B3/Greyboy Allstars

Will Bernard- Guitar/TJ Kirk

“It’s voodoo of some kind the way Moore hammers out the beat of the first two tracks, “Squash Blossom” and “Pie Eyed Manc,” only to have them shape-shift into the fluid motion of Robert Walter’s organ and the quick flick of Will Bernard’s guitar.” (Doug Collete, All About Jazz)

Stanton Moore 

Born and raised in New Orleans, Stanton Moore is a dedicated drummer and performer especially connected to the city, its culture and collaborative spirit. Driven and inspired by the thriving music scene of his hometown which includes such greats as Professor Longhair, Doctor John and The Meters, Moore’s name is now mentioned amongst these Big Easy mainstays.    

In the early ‘90s, Moore helped found the New Orleans-based essential funk band Galactic. Their first album, 1996’s widely acclaimed Coolin’ Off, led to an intense tour schedule of nearly 200 gigs a year for the next ten years. Building on their fan base by adding an esteemed list of all-star collaborations to the six albums that followed, Galactic continues to amass a worldwide audience via recording and touring globally.   Moore launched his solo career in 1998 aided by eight-string guitar virtuoso Charlie Hunter and saxophonist Skerik (Les Claypool, John Scofield, Roger Waters). The group recorded All Kooked Out! featuring a handful of local New Orleans musicians as well.   

Robert Walter

Robert Walter performs all his own stunts. For 20 years, the San Diego native has been pulling drawbars and pushing the limits of the Hammond B3 organ. Walter helped form the the Greyboy Allstars in 1993 with Karl Denson,  Elgin Park,  Chris Stillwell,  Zak Najor, and DJ Greyboy. Influenced by soul-jazz and funk records from the 1960s and 70s, the band juxtaposed jazz improvisation and dance music. They continue to record and perform to a committed fan base. The Greyboy Allstars also served as the band for Robert’s first solo record, Spirit of ’70 which also featured saxophonist and Miles Davis sideman Gary Bartz.

Will Bernard

Guitarist Will Bernard, a Berkeley, CA native and Brooklyn NY transplant studied guitar and piano from an early age with Dave Creamer, Art Lande and Julian White later developing and interest in classical music composition. Since then, Bernard has participated in a host of boundary stretching groups, ranging from jazz, hip-hop and world music to experimental music, with many stops in between. In the 90’s Bernard recorded and performed with many projects under the direction of acclaimed producer Lee Townsend and worked with groups ranging from the Hindustani-influenced Jai Uttal to the political hip-hop group the Coup. The most commercially successful of these projects was the group T.J. Kirk (with Charlie Hunter).

Be sure to follow @boomboomroomsf to join the Facebook event, and find out more details on special guests, ticket contests, and more!

Apr
28
Fri
Novos Sapatos
Apr 28 @ 1:00 PM – 4:00 PM
New Orleans Swinging Gypsies
Apr 28 @ 4:00 PM – 7:00 PM
Shotgun Jazz Band
Apr 28 @ 7:00 PM – 10:00 PM
Brass-A-Holics + Ashton Hines & The Big Easy Brawlers
Apr 28 @ 10:00 PM
Apr
29
Sat
Chance Bushman & The Ibervillianaires
Apr 29 @ 1:00 PM – 4:00 PM

Led by song and dance man Chance Bushman, the Ibervillianaires match tap and jazz dance with the party music of yesteryear. The band’s repertoire runs the gamut from classic New Orleans jazz to rock and roll, encompassing tight arrangements, blues-infused solos, and freewheeling collective improvisation. Consummate entertainers, the Ibervillianaires will have you singing along, bouncing out of your chair, and dancing in the street!.

Royal Street Winding Boys
Apr 29 @ 4:00 PM – 7:00 PM
Eric Krasno Band – Fest Late Night at The Maison
Apr 29 @ 10:00 PM – Apr 30 @ 1:00 AM
Eric Krasno Band - Fest Late Night at The Maison @ The Maison | New Orleans | LA | US
For nearly two decades, Eric Krasno has been an omnipresent figure in popular music. We’ve heard his virtuosic, innovative guitar playing with Soulive and Lettuce (both of which he co-founded), seen him onstage supporting the likes of the Rolling Stones and The Roots, watched him take home multiple GRAMMY Awards, and benefited from his deft, behind-the-scenes work as a producer and songwriter for everyone from Norah Jones, Tedeschi Trucks, and 50 Cent to Talib Kweli, Aaron Neville, and Allen Stone. Krasno’s rousing new solo album, ‘Blood From A Stone,’ reveals a previously unknown and utterly compelling side of his artistry, though, inviting us to bear witness as he both literally and metaphorically finds his voice.

“I’ve been writing songs with vocals for other people for a while,” explains Krasno, who sings for the first time on ‘Blood From A Stone.’ “With these songs, we initially wrote them thinking others would sing them, so when I was in the studio with different artists, sometimes I’d introduce one of the tracks and they’d record it, but it wouldn’t necessarily work out. Eventually, I realized it was because I’d written these songs for myself.”

It might sound strange hearing Krasno discuss the idea of “finding his voice” so deep into a career already chock full of remarkable songwriting, but as he sees it, there’s something new, something intimately personal about this album that urged him to step up to the microphone for the first time. And though so much about this album feels like uncharted territory, in some ways, it brings him all the way back to his musical roots.

“Growing up, I listened to Hendrix, the Rolling Stones, Led Zeppelin, and the Grateful Dead, along with a lot of hip-hop,” remembers Krasno.  “When I linked up with Soulive, we played instrumental music, and that’s the path I’ve mostly been on ever since. This record loops back to those initial bands and songs I loved, but with the added experience and influence of the past 20 years.”

When it came time to begin formal work on the album, Krasno left his home in New York City to join Dave Gutter from Rustic Overtones in Maine for the first writing session, which turned out to be so productive that the two had penned most of the album in just a few days. In a shift from the looser, jam/funk spirit that has marked Krasno’s previous work, the songs for ‘Blood From A Stone’ took shape as tight, infectious, highly structured blues and R&B-based tracks. Krasno and Gutter commiserated over recent relationship turmoil and their shared love of music like Bobby “Blue” Bland’s ‘Dreamer’ and Muddy Waters’ ‘Electric Mud’ to create a sonic palette at once classic and modern, deeply personal and totally timeless. Deciding to strike while the iron was hot, the duo headed into Gutter’s barn along with Ryan Zoidis (Lettuce) to lay down what they envisioned to be demos, but in fact turned out to be the backbone of the album.

“We set up an old tape machine and pieced together gear and borrowed microphones and cobbled a little studio together,” remembers Krasno. “It was one of those things where, once people heard the songs we were coming up with, every musician in town started coming by with gear and helping out. We didn’t realize we were actually making the record, so there was no pressure, and that let us experiment in really cool ways. There’s a lot of rawness to the recordings, and that really bled into the performances and my vocal delivery.”

It’s apparent from the first moments of the funky, Hendrix-esque album opener “Waiting On Your Love” that Krasno’s voice has been an ace up his sleeve this whole time. Rich, warm, and full-bodied, his tone blends earnest sincerity with casual swagger and, much like his guitar playing, taps into a deep vein of emotion. On “Torture” and “Jezebel,” he sings as a bruised survivor of love-gone-bad, while the slow-jam of “Please Ya” channels Otis Redding soul, and “On The Rise” builds off a bass-and-percussion groove with psychedelic samples and gorgeous harmonies. The album has its lighter moments, too, from “Unconditional Love”—inspired by the spirit-lifting arrival of Gutter’s daughter after school every day—to “Natalie”—a romantic ode to an automobile originally written during Krasno’s Soulive days. It’s an eclectic collection, to be sure, but it’s all tied beautifully together through Krasno’s understated vocals and skillful songcraft, which always leaves enough room for him to stretch out on his six-string.

As brilliant as Krasno’s guitar work is throughout the album, though, Derek Trucks arrives as a special guest on “Curse Lifter”—a hypnotic instrumental that lands somewhere between Santana and the Allman Brothers—to give him a real run for his money.

“Derek is my favorite guitar player in the world,” says Krasno. “I’ve known him for close to 20 years, because the first national tour Soulive ever did was with the Derek Trucks Band, and we’ve been super close ever since. I’ve watched him progress into the best, and it was really important to have him on this record.”

The track’s gorgeous, evocative guitar harmonies are a fitting way of bringing things full circle for Krasno, who’s so often utilized his guitar in the service of others. In the end, he may not have drawn blood from a stone, but Krasno discovered deep wells of soul and untapped reservoirs of talent by recording this album, and he opened up entirely new worlds for himself as an artist in the process.

“It’s something I didn’t know was there,” he concludes. “I would have been totally content just being a guitar player and writing songs for other people, but this inspiration just happened, and I’m really glad it did, because it’s changed things. I didn’t know I had this in me.”
Fiyawerx Productions presents The Heat ft. Ivan Neville, Oteil Burbridge, Stanton Moore & Eric Krasno at The Maison
Apr 29 @ 11:45 PM – Apr 30 @ 5:15 AM
Fiyawerx Productions presents The Heat ft. Ivan Neville, Oteil Burbridge, Stanton Moore & Eric Krasno at The Maison @ The Maison | New Orleans | LA | US

Saturday, April 29th at 1am **Technically Sunday, April 30th**

Fiyawerx Productions presents The Heat

featuring…

Ivan Neville

Oteil Burbridge

Stanton Moore

& Eric Krasno

Late Night at The Maison during Jazz Fest 2017

Apr
30
Sun
Swingin’ Jazz Brunch with Chance Bushman & The NOLA Jitterbugs
Apr 30 @ 10:00 AM – 1:00 PM

NOLA Jitterbugs is dedicated to the preservation, promotion, and (yes!) innovation of Traditional American Music and Dance.

Kristina Morales
Apr 30 @ 1:00 PM – 4:00 PM
Loose Marbles
Apr 30 @ 4:00 PM – 7:00 PM
Brad Walker
Apr 30 @ 7:00 PM – 10:00 PM
Higher Heights
Apr 30 @ 10:00 PM
May
1
Mon
Chicken & Waffles
May 1 @ 4:00 PM – 7:00 PM
Aurora Nealand & the Royal Roses
May 1 @ 7:00 PM – 10:00 PM

The Royal Roses grew out of the rich resurgence that traditional jazz is seeing in New Orleans amongst the younger generation of musicians today. Saxophonist/vocalist Aurora Nealand has been playing in various groups in New Orleans since 2005, and the Royal Roses, founded in 2010, is her first venture as a bandleader. The Royal Roses draw their repertoire heavily from Sidney Bechet, Django Reinhart and traditional jazz of New Orleans. Comprised of some of the finest young players on the New Orleans music scene today, the Royal Roses are seeking to breath new energy, arrangements and compositions into this genre of music while exploring and learning from its rich history and tradition. They‘ve performed in New Orleans at the French Quarter Festival, Satchmo Festival and Preservation Hall, as well as in NYC at Lincoln Center Out of Doors Festival. Their first album “A Tribute to Sydney Bechet: Live at Preservation Hall” was released in 2011 to national acclaim. Current members are: Aurora Nealand (vocals/saxophone), David Boswell (trumpet), Matt Bell (vocals/guitar), Bill Machow (piano), Josh Gouzy (bass), Nathan Lambertson (bass) and Paul Thibodeaux (drums).

 

RESERVE A TABLE FOR THIS SHOW!
Raw Deal
May 1 @ 10:00 PM
May
2
Tue
Krisitna Morales & The Bayou Shufflers
May 2 @ 4:00 PM – 6:30 PM
Gregory Agid Quartet
May 2 @ 6:30 PM – 9:30 PM

Trad jazz clarinetist Greg Agid got his New Orleans start at the Louis Armstrong Jazz Camp, being mentored by luminaries like Alvin Batiste and Kidd Jordan. Infusing the rhythms and sounds of the musicians that have gone before him with his personal experiences and tastes, Agid sees himself as part of the great musical continuum that is New Orleans. His mission is to move the sound to its logical next step while delighting audiences throughout the city with his sprightly, effervescent clarinet performances. He takes the stage with his quartet every Tuesday at Maison on Frenchmen, plus appearing with Delfeayo Marsalis’s Uptown Jazz Orchestra at Snug Harbor on Wednesdays. He’s also a frequent guest at the Spotted Cat and Mimi’s in the Marigny.

Ashton Hines & The Big Easy Brawlers
May 2 @ 9:30 PM
May
3
Wed
Royal Street Winding Boys
May 3 @ 4:00 PM – 6:30 PM
The New Orleans Jazz Vipers
May 3 @ 6:30 PM – 9:30 PM

In 2009, the original New Orleans Jazz Vipers morphed into two new bands, Joe Braun’s The New Orleans Jazz Vipers and the New Orleans Cottonmouth Kings featuring six former Jazz Vipers. You can hear both bands playing regularly on Frenchmen Street in New Orleans, and both have released new CDs available at their websites.

The original New Orleans Jazz Vipers were a popular and active band in New Orleans for many years, pioneers of the Frenchmen Street scene, with a twice-weekly residency at the Spotted Cat 2003 to 2009. Noteable festival appearances included the Jazz Fest, French Quarter Fest, Lincoln Center Midsummer Night Swing and the Monterey Jazz Festival (in September 2005). Part of the unique sound of the Jazz Vipers came from the fact that they rarely used any amplification. The sound of the band was at the same time retro, full of energy and unpretentious, with both up-tempo dance numbers and well-chosen ballads; it has been aptly described as neo-trad-jazz. The band received many awards in Louisiana including the Gambit’s “Big Easy” award in 2005 for “Best Traditional Jazz Band,” and Offbeat Magazine’s “Best of the Beat” award in 2004 for “Best Traditional Jazz Album” (for the album “Live on Frenchmen Street”). In 2001 and 2003 they won the “Best of the Beat” award for “Best Emerging Traditional Jazz Band.”

 

RESERVE A TABLE FOR THIS SHOW!
Wahala Boys
May 3 @ 9:30 PM – 11:45 PM
Live For Live Music Presents Megawatt Future Dub Soundclash featuring Bajah + Adam Deitch + Borahm Lee + Josh Werner + Raja Kasis + Luke Quaranta + Weedie Braimah + Khris Royal + Maurice Brown
May 3 @ 11:59 PM

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wednesday, May 3rd, 2017 | 12:30am *Technically, Thursday, May 3rd

Live for Live Music presents Megawatt All-Star Tribute to Roots Reggae and Dub Music

Featuring

Bajah

Adam Deitch

Borahm Lee

Josh Werner

Raja Kasis

Luke Quaranta

Weedie Braimah

Khris Royal

Maurice Brown

May
4
Thu
The Good For Nothin’ Band
May 4 @ 4:00 PM – 7:00 PM

The Good For Nothin’ Band is to the New Orleans music scene what Al Capone was to the Chicago Mafia, ” The Enforcer of Wow “ the hot bang club, original, defying cultures, tastes, genres, and decor, sacrilege in all its perfection, a feast for the soul of wayfaring pilgrims searching for the Un-Holy Grail of seedy salvation. This pack of rouge delinquents will decapitate your senses with songs and music crafted from utter mayhem and sheer debauchery. The lucky pilgrim who ventures into the room with these deplorable angels with leave molecularly scathed, never to be integrated into normalcy again, forever changed to roam the earth in the fog of delightful Whiggery. When in Nola, seek out these degenerate scallawags and drink in the groove shadows of this notorious city of wonder as they bombard you with their infamous musical tales of the city of dreams. The Good For Nothin Band , coming to your local sleaze palace and insane asylum.

 

good for nothin

Sweet Substitute Jazz Band
May 4 @ 7:00 PM – 10:00 PM

Sweet Substitute Trad Jazz Band performs early jazz which was born in New Orleans.

The Sweet Substitute Jazz Band plays Traditional New Orleans Jazz in New Orleans.

  • Ryan Robertson – Trumpet and Vocals
  • Chad Mo Moore – Clarinet
  • Nicholas Snyder – Banjo and Vocals
  • Brandon Brunious – Bass
  • Nita Hemeter – Drums
  • Janice Medlock – Trombone, Piano and Vocals
  • Li’l Josephine – Bass
  • Bob Marquart – Trumpet and Vocals

Dysfunktional Bone
May 4 @ 10:00 PM – May 5 @ 12:00 AM

In August 2012, a new sound emerged from New Orleans, La, known as Dysfunktional Bone. Since then, Dysfunktional Bone has been playing frequently on Frenchmen St. and across southern Louisiana, wowing audiences with their high energy set. Blending a powerful horn-heavy frontline with a rocking rhythm section, Dysfunktional Bone combines Jimi Hendrix, The Beatles, the J.B. Horns, original Nola funk, and much more into one action packed set. 

Justin Pardue – trombone/vocals
Jonathan Lyons – tenor sax/vocals
Jimmie Reamey – trumpet/vocals
Pete Roze – guitar
AJ Alluli – keys
Miles Lyons – sousaphone
Brendan Bull – drums

Fiyawerx Productions presents FIYA POWA 2017 at The Maison
May 4 @ 11:45 PM – May 5 @ 5:45 AM
Fiyawerx Productions presents FIYA POWA 2017 at The Maison @ The Maison | New Orleans | LA | US

Thursday, May 4th, 2017 at 2AM *Technically Friday Morning* at The Maison

Fiyawerx Productions presents FIYA POWA 2017 featuring…

Leo Nocentelli

Ivan Neville

Stanton Moore

Tony Hall

Big Sam

Skerik

Roosevelt Collier

& Maurice Brown

May
5
Fri
Shotgun Jazz Band
May 5 @ 7:00 PM – 10:00 PM
Fest Late Night with Dirty Dozen Brass Band at The Maison
May 5 @ 9:30 PM – May 6 @ 1:00 AM
Fest Late Night with Dirty Dozen Brass Band at The Maison @ The Maison | New Orleans | LA | US

Fest Late Night featuring…

Dirty Dozen Brass Band

Friday, May 5th, 2017

9PM at The Maison on Frenchmen Street


 

Dirty Dozen Brass Band

To describe how the Dirty Dozen Brass Band has arrived at its 35th Anniversary, trumpet player Gregory Davis employs a tried-and true New Orleans-centric analogy: “It ends up being like a pot of gumbo – you drop in a little okra, drop in a little shrimp, you drop in some crabs. Before you know it, you’ve mixed in all these different ingredients and you’ve got a beautiful soup. That was our approach to music early on and it still is today.”

Baritone sax player Roger Lewis — who, like Davis, has been with the combo since its inception in 1977 — echoes that sentiment: “It’s a big old musical gumbo, and that probably made the difference, separating us from other brass bands out of New Orleans. It put a different twist on the music. We were not trying to change anything, we were just playing the music we wanted to play and not stay in one particular bag.”

An appetite for musicological adventure, a commitment to honor tradition while not being constrained by it, and a healthy sense of humor have brought the world-traveling Dirty Dozen Brass Band to this remarkable juncture in an already storied career. To celebrate its 35th, the band is releasing Twenty Dozen, the septet’s first studio release in six years. The new album, cut at the Music Shed in New Orleans, reunites the band with producer Scott Billington, who helmed DDBB’s first major-label release, Voodoo, in 1989. It’s a resolutely upbeat effort that seamlessly blends R&B, jazz, funk, Afro-Latino grooves, some Caribbean flavor, and even a Rihanna cover. Twenty Dozen mirrors in flow and feel a vibrant DDBB live set. The disc reaches an exuberant peak with a medley of New Orleans staples, including a particularly high-spirited rendering of “When the Saints Go Marching In.” The final track – or, as Lewis puts it, “the after-party” – is an audience encore favorite, the ribald “Dirty Old Man,” with Lewis doing an outstanding job in the title role. Twenty Dozen, says Lewis, is “classic Dirty Dozen. It’s got something for your mind, body, and soul. We’re gonna get you one way or another.”

Twenty Dozen is also very much a group effort, with each of the members – Davis, Lewis, tenor-sax man Kevin Harris, trumpeter Efrem Towns, sousaphonist Kirk Joseph, drummer Terence Higgins and guitarist Jake Eckert — bringing original compositions or arrangement ideas to the sessions. It kicks off with the light-hearted funk of “Tomorrow,” segues into the jazzier “Jook” then heads into the party-hearty island groove of “Best Of All.” Billington suggested DDBB cover Rihanna’s “Don’t Stop the Music,” and the group’s reinterpretation is as ingenious as it is fun. The tough, seventies-style soul of “We Gon’ Roll” supplies the most serious moment, as composer Higgins pays tribute to the indomitable nature of his fellow NOLA residents. As Davis – whose own “Git Up” is a smoking jazz workout — explains, “Just about everybody had a song or something they wanted to contribute. As we started to record the songs and listen to them, each song seemed to fit not just with the character of the individuals who wrote them but the character of the band. We are the Dirty Dozen and it’s the overall character of the band that makes the live show work –and that makes this record work. Had we planned to make a certain kind of record, it might not have come out like that. In letting the guys’ voices speak and come out on their own, the album turned out this way.”

The traditional numbers at the tail end of Twenty Dozen serve as a reminder of how the group, since the beginning, has tried to reinvigorate the standards and build a bridge between old and new. Says Davis, “Over the last few years we have been doing a medley that has included ‘Paul Barbarin’s Second Line,’ ‘E Flat Blues’ and ‘Saints.’ It had been going over so well that we thought maybe we needed to capture the spirit of what we’re doing with this medley and put it on a record. ‘Saints’ is one of the most requested songs we do and you have to face the challenge of playing that song so many times. But once you get that started and see the smiles on people’s faces and they start dancing to it, it makes you want to do it a little bit more. In the studio, I was envisioning different scenes from our audiences. I’d remember the reaction I would get attempting to get people up to dance, to do certain steps and follow me. It made it so much fun to remember the faces, the smiles, the body movements of the people. To get them up, to get them sweating — it’s always a pleasure.” Listening to this new “Saints” rendition on disc has the same effect: it’s impossible to remain in your easy chair. Davis considers this and, laughing, imagines a new opportunity for the band: ““Maybe we need to sell this as a work-out CD.”

While traditional numbers infused with a DDBB flavor have always been crowd-pleasing staples of the group’s repertoire, it’s the Dirty Dozen Brass Band’s willingness to look beyond the New Orleans songbook and find connections amongst a wider range of music that has endeared them to critics, fellow musicians and a multi-generational, global audience. They’ve been embraced enthusiastically by the jam-band followers at Bonnaroo as well as by the devotees who flock to the yearly New Orleans Jazz Fest. Acts like the Black Crowes and Widespread Panic have taken them on tour and artists from Dizzy Gillespie to Elvis Costello to Norah Jones have joined them in the studio. In the wake of Hurricane Katrina, DDBB participated in the From the Big Apple to the Big Easy benefit at New York City’s Madison Square Garden and offered its own response to the aftermath of the disaster with an acclaimed 2006 song-by-song remake of Marvin Gaye’s What’s Going On. Their music has been featured on the HBO series, Treme, named after the New Orleans mid-city neighborhood where the band had formed, and the group performed on screen with Galactic and rapper Juvenile in Season 2. New Orleans remains a wellspring of musical inspiration and DDBB is a living, breathing embodiment of the continued vitality and evolution of the sounds of the city.

But, Davis cautions, “We’ve never been the norm, even though we started out as a traditional New Orleans brass band. In the beginning we weren’t getting work of any kind, so we thought it was okay to explore other music. That allowed us as individuals to bring ourselves into the rehearsals and that’s where we started to experiment. At the time the band started, I was a student at Loyola University and we were all being introduced to other music – to jazz from the twentieth century and so on. It’s impossible to think that you can be exposed to the harmonies that Duke Ellington was making, the rhythms coming from Dizzy Gillespie or the funk being done by James Brown, and then ignore it when you’re playing New Orleans music. New Orleans music is all of that. If we had chosen to just put in the music presented to us then as traditional, it would have stunted our growth. Being more than what we heard is what the band was about. “

DDBB enjoyed the opportunity to look back with the 2011 reissue of it galvanizing 1984 debut, My Feet Can’t Fail Me Now, but the hard-working band has little time for nostalgia. For mainstays like Davis and Lewis, 35 years have passed in the blink of an eye, as Lewis, who also sits in with several other NOLA combos, acknowledges: “Check it out – I’m 70 years old, I’m the oldest dude in the band – I’m the oldest dude in everybody’s band, now that I think about it. I don’t know where the time went. I guess it’s just the music, man, you don’t be thinking about all that. I’ve been in it 35 straight years. The reason why the band stayed together for so long, despite all we’ve gone through, it’s the right chemistry. We’re trying to make it do what it do. If we have this conversation when I’m 80, we’ll still be trying to make it do what it do.”

“As we continue to do live shows,” Davis concludes, “the challenge is still going to be, how am I going to entertain these people that are in front of me tonight? You have to make that happen at the moment, and that’s what we do best.”

Worship My Organ (Late-Nite 1:30AM) ft. Marco Benevento/John Medeski/Robert Walter/Skerik/Daru Jones & DJ Logic
May 5 @ 11:30 PM – May 6 @ 5:30 AM
Worship My Organ (Late-Nite 1:30AM) ft. Marco Benevento/John Medeski/Robert Walter/Skerik/Daru Jones & DJ Logic @ The Maison | New Orleans | LA | US

BooM BooM RooM Presents 

Worship My Organ

Late Nite 1:30-5:30 AM **Technically Saturday Morning**

THREE HAMMOND B3 Organs- HISTORIC AllStar Show!

Marco Benevento- B3 & Keys/ Benevento Russo Duo

Robert Walter- B3 & Keys/ Greyboy Allstars

John Medeski- B3 & Keys/ Medeski-Martin & Wood

Skerik- Saxophone/Les Claypool

Daru Jones- Drums/Jack White

DJ Logic- Turntables/John Popper Project 

Worship My Organ will be taking place from 1:30 AM – 5:30 AM on the night of Friday May 5th. This show is a JazzFest-Late-Nite tradition, brought to you by the BooM BooM RooM presents, creating an array of sounds, that you can only catch once, as the all start line up rotates annually. This epic show always sells out, so get your tickets NOW! 

Be sure to follow @boomboomroomsf to join the Facebook event, and find out more details on special guests, ticket contests, and more!

May
6
Sat
Chance Bushman & The Ibervillianaires
May 6 @ 1:00 PM – 4:00 PM

Led by song and dance man Chance Bushman, the Ibervillianaires match tap and jazz dance with the party music of yesteryear. The band’s repertoire runs the gamut from classic New Orleans jazz to rock and roll, encompassing tight arrangements, blues-infused solos, and freewheeling collective improvisation. Consummate entertainers, the Ibervillianaires will have you singing along, bouncing out of your chair, and dancing in the street!.

Smoking Time Jazz Club
May 6 @ 7:00 PM – 10:00 PM

SMOKING TIME JAZZ CLUB IS A NEW ORLEANS BASED TRADITIONAL JAZZ BAND REVIVING THE MUSIC OF THE 1920S AND 30S FOR TODAYS LISTENERS, SWING DANCERS AND JAZZ FANS.

THE BAND WAS FORMED IN 2010 IN THE MUSICAL GUMBO THAT IS NEW ORLEANS. RIDING THE CREST OF THE FRENCHMEN STREET SWING RENAISSANCE THEY FIND JOY AND INSPIRATION FROM THE CITY AND THE MUSIC WRITTEN BY THE GREAT TURN OF THE CENTURY ARTISTS WHO MADE JAZZ THE LIVING CULTURAL LEGACY IT IS TODAY.

 

Book now!
Fest Late Night with Rebirth Brass Band + Sexual Thunder!
May 6 @ 10:00 PM

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Get down late night after Jazz Fest 2017 with Grammy Award-winning Rebirth Brass Band and local funk favorites, Sexual Thunder! at The Maison on Frenchmen Street in New Orleans.

Saturday, May 6th, 2017

Doors: 10pm

Show Time: 11pm

May
7
Sun
Swingin’ Jazz Brunch with Chance Bushman & The NOLA Jitterbugs
May 7 @ 10:00 AM – 1:00 PM

NOLA Jitterbugs is dedicated to the preservation, promotion, and (yes!) innovation of Traditional American Music and Dance.

Kristina Morales & The Bayou Shufflers
May 7 @ 1:00 PM – 4:00 PM
Loose Marbles
May 7 @ 4:00 PM – 7:00 PM
Royal Street Winding Boys
May 7 @ 7:00 PM – 10:00 PM
Higher Heights
May 7 @ 10:00 PM
May
8
Mon
Chicken & Waffles
May 8 @ 4:00 PM – 7:00 PM
Aurora Nealand & the Royal Roses
May 8 @ 7:00 PM – 10:00 PM

The Royal Roses grew out of the rich resurgence that traditional jazz is seeing in New Orleans amongst the younger generation of musicians today. Saxophonist/vocalist Aurora Nealand has been playing in various groups in New Orleans since 2005, and the Royal Roses, founded in 2010, is her first venture as a bandleader. The Royal Roses draw their repertoire heavily from Sidney Bechet, Django Reinhart and traditional jazz of New Orleans. Comprised of some of the finest young players on the New Orleans music scene today, the Royal Roses are seeking to breath new energy, arrangements and compositions into this genre of music while exploring and learning from its rich history and tradition. They‘ve performed in New Orleans at the French Quarter Festival, Satchmo Festival and Preservation Hall, as well as in NYC at Lincoln Center Out of Doors Festival. Their first album “A Tribute to Sydney Bechet: Live at Preservation Hall” was released in 2011 to national acclaim. Current members are: Aurora Nealand (vocals/saxophone), David Boswell (trumpet), Matt Bell (vocals/guitar), Bill Machow (piano), Josh Gouzy (bass), Nathan Lambertson (bass) and Paul Thibodeaux (drums).

 

RESERVE A TABLE FOR THIS SHOW!
RnR Music Group
May 8 @ 10:00 PM
Apr
25
Tue
McKenna Alicia
Apr 25 @ 4:00 PM – 6:30 PM
Gregory Agid Quartet
Apr 25 @ 6:30 PM – 9:30 PM

Trad jazz clarinetist Greg Agid got his New Orleans start at the Louis Armstrong Jazz Camp, being mentored by luminaries like Alvin Batiste and Kidd Jordan. Infusing the rhythms and sounds of the musicians that have gone before him with his personal experiences and tastes, Agid sees himself as part of the great musical continuum that is New Orleans. His mission is to move the sound to its logical next step while delighting audiences throughout the city with his sprightly, effervescent clarinet performances. He takes the stage with his quartet every Tuesday at Maison on Frenchmen, plus appearing with Delfeayo Marsalis’s Uptown Jazz Orchestra at Snug Harbor on Wednesdays. He’s also a frequent guest at the Spotted Cat and Mimi’s in the Marigny.

BrassLightning
Apr 25 @ 9:30 PM
Apr
26
Wed
Heather Holloway & The Heebie Jeebies
Apr 26 @ 4:00 PM – 6:30 PM
The New Orleans Jazz Vipers
Apr 26 @ 6:30 PM – 9:30 PM

In 2009, the original New Orleans Jazz Vipers morphed into two new bands, Joe Braun’s The New Orleans Jazz Vipers and the New Orleans Cottonmouth Kings featuring six former Jazz Vipers. You can hear both bands playing regularly on Frenchmen Street in New Orleans, and both have released new CDs available at their websites.

The original New Orleans Jazz Vipers were a popular and active band in New Orleans for many years, pioneers of the Frenchmen Street scene, with a twice-weekly residency at the Spotted Cat 2003 to 2009. Noteable festival appearances included the Jazz Fest, French Quarter Fest, Lincoln Center Midsummer Night Swing and the Monterey Jazz Festival (in September 2005). Part of the unique sound of the Jazz Vipers came from the fact that they rarely used any amplification. The sound of the band was at the same time retro, full of energy and unpretentious, with both up-tempo dance numbers and well-chosen ballads; it has been aptly described as neo-trad-jazz. The band received many awards in Louisiana including the Gambit’s “Big Easy” award in 2005 for “Best Traditional Jazz Band,” and Offbeat Magazine’s “Best of the Beat” award in 2004 for “Best Traditional Jazz Album” (for the album “Live on Frenchmen Street”). In 2001 and 2003 they won the “Best of the Beat” award for “Best Emerging Traditional Jazz Band.”

 

RESERVE A TABLE FOR THIS SHOW!
Danny Abel & Friends
Apr 26 @ 9:30 PM
Apr
27
Thu
Tuba Skinny
Apr 27 @ 4:00 PM – 7:00 PM
The Good For Nothin’ Band
Apr 27 @ 7:00 PM – 10:00 PM
The Original Stanton Moore Trio ft. Robert Walter/Will Bernard & Special Guests
Apr 27 @ 9:30 PM – Apr 28 @ 4:00 AM
The Original Stanton Moore Trio ft. Robert Walter/Will Bernard & Special Guests @ The Maison | New Orleans | LA | US

Boom Boom Room Presents 

The Original Stanton Moore Trio & Special Guests 

featuring: 

Stanton Moore – Drums/Galactic

Robert Walter- B3/Greyboy Allstars

Will Bernard- Guitar/TJ Kirk

“It’s voodoo of some kind the way Moore hammers out the beat of the first two tracks, “Squash Blossom” and “Pie Eyed Manc,” only to have them shape-shift into the fluid motion of Robert Walter’s organ and the quick flick of Will Bernard’s guitar.” (Doug Collete, All About Jazz)

Stanton Moore 

Born and raised in New Orleans, Stanton Moore is a dedicated drummer and performer especially connected to the city, its culture and collaborative spirit. Driven and inspired by the thriving music scene of his hometown which includes such greats as Professor Longhair, Doctor John and The Meters, Moore’s name is now mentioned amongst these Big Easy mainstays.    

In the early ‘90s, Moore helped found the New Orleans-based essential funk band Galactic. Their first album, 1996’s widely acclaimed Coolin’ Off, led to an intense tour schedule of nearly 200 gigs a year for the next ten years. Building on their fan base by adding an esteemed list of all-star collaborations to the six albums that followed, Galactic continues to amass a worldwide audience via recording and touring globally.   Moore launched his solo career in 1998 aided by eight-string guitar virtuoso Charlie Hunter and saxophonist Skerik (Les Claypool, John Scofield, Roger Waters). The group recorded All Kooked Out! featuring a handful of local New Orleans musicians as well.   

Robert Walter

Robert Walter performs all his own stunts. For 20 years, the San Diego native has been pulling drawbars and pushing the limits of the Hammond B3 organ. Walter helped form the the Greyboy Allstars in 1993 with Karl Denson,  Elgin Park,  Chris Stillwell,  Zak Najor, and DJ Greyboy. Influenced by soul-jazz and funk records from the 1960s and 70s, the band juxtaposed jazz improvisation and dance music. They continue to record and perform to a committed fan base. The Greyboy Allstars also served as the band for Robert’s first solo record, Spirit of ’70 which also featured saxophonist and Miles Davis sideman Gary Bartz.

Will Bernard

Guitarist Will Bernard, a Berkeley, CA native and Brooklyn NY transplant studied guitar and piano from an early age with Dave Creamer, Art Lande and Julian White later developing and interest in classical music composition. Since then, Bernard has participated in a host of boundary stretching groups, ranging from jazz, hip-hop and world music to experimental music, with many stops in between. In the 90’s Bernard recorded and performed with many projects under the direction of acclaimed producer Lee Townsend and worked with groups ranging from the Hindustani-influenced Jai Uttal to the political hip-hop group the Coup. The most commercially successful of these projects was the group T.J. Kirk (with Charlie Hunter).

Be sure to follow @boomboomroomsf to join the Facebook event, and find out more details on special guests, ticket contests, and more!

Apr
28
Fri
Novos Sapatos
Apr 28 @ 1:00 PM – 4:00 PM
New Orleans Swinging Gypsies
Apr 28 @ 4:00 PM – 7:00 PM
Shotgun Jazz Band
Apr 28 @ 7:00 PM – 10:00 PM
Brass-A-Holics + Ashton Hines & The Big Easy Brawlers
Apr 28 @ 10:00 PM
Apr
29
Sat
Chance Bushman & The Ibervillianaires
Apr 29 @ 1:00 PM – 4:00 PM

Led by song and dance man Chance Bushman, the Ibervillianaires match tap and jazz dance with the party music of yesteryear. The band’s repertoire runs the gamut from classic New Orleans jazz to rock and roll, encompassing tight arrangements, blues-infused solos, and freewheeling collective improvisation. Consummate entertainers, the Ibervillianaires will have you singing along, bouncing out of your chair, and dancing in the street!.

Royal Street Winding Boys
Apr 29 @ 4:00 PM – 7:00 PM
Eric Krasno Band – Fest Late Night at The Maison
Apr 29 @ 10:00 PM – Apr 30 @ 1:00 AM
Eric Krasno Band - Fest Late Night at The Maison @ The Maison | New Orleans | LA | US
For nearly two decades, Eric Krasno has been an omnipresent figure in popular music. We’ve heard his virtuosic, innovative guitar playing with Soulive and Lettuce (both of which he co-founded), seen him onstage supporting the likes of the Rolling Stones and The Roots, watched him take home multiple GRAMMY Awards, and benefited from his deft, behind-the-scenes work as a producer and songwriter for everyone from Norah Jones, Tedeschi Trucks, and 50 Cent to Talib Kweli, Aaron Neville, and Allen Stone. Krasno’s rousing new solo album, ‘Blood From A Stone,’ reveals a previously unknown and utterly compelling side of his artistry, though, inviting us to bear witness as he both literally and metaphorically finds his voice.

“I’ve been writing songs with vocals for other people for a while,” explains Krasno, who sings for the first time on ‘Blood From A Stone.’ “With these songs, we initially wrote them thinking others would sing them, so when I was in the studio with different artists, sometimes I’d introduce one of the tracks and they’d record it, but it wouldn’t necessarily work out. Eventually, I realized it was because I’d written these songs for myself.”

It might sound strange hearing Krasno discuss the idea of “finding his voice” so deep into a career already chock full of remarkable songwriting, but as he sees it, there’s something new, something intimately personal about this album that urged him to step up to the microphone for the first time. And though so much about this album feels like uncharted territory, in some ways, it brings him all the way back to his musical roots.

“Growing up, I listened to Hendrix, the Rolling Stones, Led Zeppelin, and the Grateful Dead, along with a lot of hip-hop,” remembers Krasno.  “When I linked up with Soulive, we played instrumental music, and that’s the path I’ve mostly been on ever since. This record loops back to those initial bands and songs I loved, but with the added experience and influence of the past 20 years.”

When it came time to begin formal work on the album, Krasno left his home in New York City to join Dave Gutter from Rustic Overtones in Maine for the first writing session, which turned out to be so productive that the two had penned most of the album in just a few days. In a shift from the looser, jam/funk spirit that has marked Krasno’s previous work, the songs for ‘Blood From A Stone’ took shape as tight, infectious, highly structured blues and R&B-based tracks. Krasno and Gutter commiserated over recent relationship turmoil and their shared love of music like Bobby “Blue” Bland’s ‘Dreamer’ and Muddy Waters’ ‘Electric Mud’ to create a sonic palette at once classic and modern, deeply personal and totally timeless. Deciding to strike while the iron was hot, the duo headed into Gutter’s barn along with Ryan Zoidis (Lettuce) to lay down what they envisioned to be demos, but in fact turned out to be the backbone of the album.

“We set up an old tape machine and pieced together gear and borrowed microphones and cobbled a little studio together,” remembers Krasno. “It was one of those things where, once people heard the songs we were coming up with, every musician in town started coming by with gear and helping out. We didn’t realize we were actually making the record, so there was no pressure, and that let us experiment in really cool ways. There’s a lot of rawness to the recordings, and that really bled into the performances and my vocal delivery.”

It’s apparent from the first moments of the funky, Hendrix-esque album opener “Waiting On Your Love” that Krasno’s voice has been an ace up his sleeve this whole time. Rich, warm, and full-bodied, his tone blends earnest sincerity with casual swagger and, much like his guitar playing, taps into a deep vein of emotion. On “Torture” and “Jezebel,” he sings as a bruised survivor of love-gone-bad, while the slow-jam of “Please Ya” channels Otis Redding soul, and “On The Rise” builds off a bass-and-percussion groove with psychedelic samples and gorgeous harmonies. The album has its lighter moments, too, from “Unconditional Love”—inspired by the spirit-lifting arrival of Gutter’s daughter after school every day—to “Natalie”—a romantic ode to an automobile originally written during Krasno’s Soulive days. It’s an eclectic collection, to be sure, but it’s all tied beautifully together through Krasno’s understated vocals and skillful songcraft, which always leaves enough room for him to stretch out on his six-string.

As brilliant as Krasno’s guitar work is throughout the album, though, Derek Trucks arrives as a special guest on “Curse Lifter”—a hypnotic instrumental that lands somewhere between Santana and the Allman Brothers—to give him a real run for his money.

“Derek is my favorite guitar player in the world,” says Krasno. “I’ve known him for close to 20 years, because the first national tour Soulive ever did was with the Derek Trucks Band, and we’ve been super close ever since. I’ve watched him progress into the best, and it was really important to have him on this record.”

The track’s gorgeous, evocative guitar harmonies are a fitting way of bringing things full circle for Krasno, who’s so often utilized his guitar in the service of others. In the end, he may not have drawn blood from a stone, but Krasno discovered deep wells of soul and untapped reservoirs of talent by recording this album, and he opened up entirely new worlds for himself as an artist in the process.

“It’s something I didn’t know was there,” he concludes. “I would have been totally content just being a guitar player and writing songs for other people, but this inspiration just happened, and I’m really glad it did, because it’s changed things. I didn’t know I had this in me.”
Fiyawerx Productions presents The Heat ft. Ivan Neville, Oteil Burbridge, Stanton Moore & Eric Krasno at The Maison
Apr 29 @ 11:45 PM – Apr 30 @ 5:15 AM
Fiyawerx Productions presents The Heat ft. Ivan Neville, Oteil Burbridge, Stanton Moore & Eric Krasno at The Maison @ The Maison | New Orleans | LA | US

Saturday, April 29th at 1am **Technically Sunday, April 30th**

Fiyawerx Productions presents The Heat

featuring…

Ivan Neville

Oteil Burbridge

Stanton Moore

& Eric Krasno

Late Night at The Maison during Jazz Fest 2017

Apr
30
Sun
Swingin’ Jazz Brunch with Chance Bushman & The NOLA Jitterbugs
Apr 30 @ 10:00 AM – 1:00 PM

NOLA Jitterbugs is dedicated to the preservation, promotion, and (yes!) innovation of Traditional American Music and Dance.

Kristina Morales
Apr 30 @ 1:00 PM – 4:00 PM
Loose Marbles
Apr 30 @ 4:00 PM – 7:00 PM
Brad Walker
Apr 30 @ 7:00 PM – 10:00 PM
Higher Heights
Apr 30 @ 10:00 PM
May
1
Mon
Chicken & Waffles
May 1 @ 4:00 PM – 7:00 PM
Aurora Nealand & the Royal Roses
May 1 @ 7:00 PM – 10:00 PM

The Royal Roses grew out of the rich resurgence that traditional jazz is seeing in New Orleans amongst the younger generation of musicians today. Saxophonist/vocalist Aurora Nealand has been playing in various groups in New Orleans since 2005, and the Royal Roses, founded in 2010, is her first venture as a bandleader. The Royal Roses draw their repertoire heavily from Sidney Bechet, Django Reinhart and traditional jazz of New Orleans. Comprised of some of the finest young players on the New Orleans music scene today, the Royal Roses are seeking to breath new energy, arrangements and compositions into this genre of music while exploring and learning from its rich history and tradition. They‘ve performed in New Orleans at the French Quarter Festival, Satchmo Festival and Preservation Hall, as well as in NYC at Lincoln Center Out of Doors Festival. Their first album “A Tribute to Sydney Bechet: Live at Preservation Hall” was released in 2011 to national acclaim. Current members are: Aurora Nealand (vocals/saxophone), David Boswell (trumpet), Matt Bell (vocals/guitar), Bill Machow (piano), Josh Gouzy (bass), Nathan Lambertson (bass) and Paul Thibodeaux (drums).

 

RESERVE A TABLE FOR THIS SHOW!
Raw Deal
May 1 @ 10:00 PM
May
2
Tue
Krisitna Morales & The Bayou Shufflers
May 2 @ 4:00 PM – 6:30 PM
Gregory Agid Quartet
May 2 @ 6:30 PM – 9:30 PM

Trad jazz clarinetist Greg Agid got his New Orleans start at the Louis Armstrong Jazz Camp, being mentored by luminaries like Alvin Batiste and Kidd Jordan. Infusing the rhythms and sounds of the musicians that have gone before him with his personal experiences and tastes, Agid sees himself as part of the great musical continuum that is New Orleans. His mission is to move the sound to its logical next step while delighting audiences throughout the city with his sprightly, effervescent clarinet performances. He takes the stage with his quartet every Tuesday at Maison on Frenchmen, plus appearing with Delfeayo Marsalis’s Uptown Jazz Orchestra at Snug Harbor on Wednesdays. He’s also a frequent guest at the Spotted Cat and Mimi’s in the Marigny.

Ashton Hines & The Big Easy Brawlers
May 2 @ 9:30 PM
May
3
Wed
Royal Street Winding Boys
May 3 @ 4:00 PM – 6:30 PM
The New Orleans Jazz Vipers
May 3 @ 6:30 PM – 9:30 PM

In 2009, the original New Orleans Jazz Vipers morphed into two new bands, Joe Braun’s The New Orleans Jazz Vipers and the New Orleans Cottonmouth Kings featuring six former Jazz Vipers. You can hear both bands playing regularly on Frenchmen Street in New Orleans, and both have released new CDs available at their websites.

The original New Orleans Jazz Vipers were a popular and active band in New Orleans for many years, pioneers of the Frenchmen Street scene, with a twice-weekly residency at the Spotted Cat 2003 to 2009. Noteable festival appearances included the Jazz Fest, French Quarter Fest, Lincoln Center Midsummer Night Swing and the Monterey Jazz Festival (in September 2005). Part of the unique sound of the Jazz Vipers came from the fact that they rarely used any amplification. The sound of the band was at the same time retro, full of energy and unpretentious, with both up-tempo dance numbers and well-chosen ballads; it has been aptly described as neo-trad-jazz. The band received many awards in Louisiana including the Gambit’s “Big Easy” award in 2005 for “Best Traditional Jazz Band,” and Offbeat Magazine’s “Best of the Beat” award in 2004 for “Best Traditional Jazz Album” (for the album “Live on Frenchmen Street”). In 2001 and 2003 they won the “Best of the Beat” award for “Best Emerging Traditional Jazz Band.”

 

RESERVE A TABLE FOR THIS SHOW!
Wahala Boys
May 3 @ 9:30 PM – 11:45 PM
Live For Live Music Presents Megawatt Future Dub Soundclash featuring Bajah + Adam Deitch + Borahm Lee + Josh Werner + Raja Kasis + Luke Quaranta + Weedie Braimah + Khris Royal + Maurice Brown
May 3 @ 11:59 PM

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wednesday, May 3rd, 2017 | 12:30am *Technically, Thursday, May 3rd

Live for Live Music presents Megawatt All-Star Tribute to Roots Reggae and Dub Music

Featuring

Bajah

Adam Deitch

Borahm Lee

Josh Werner

Raja Kasis

Luke Quaranta

Weedie Braimah

Khris Royal

Maurice Brown

May
4
Thu
The Good For Nothin’ Band
May 4 @ 4:00 PM – 7:00 PM

The Good For Nothin’ Band is to the New Orleans music scene what Al Capone was to the Chicago Mafia, ” The Enforcer of Wow “ the hot bang club, original, defying cultures, tastes, genres, and decor, sacrilege in all its perfection, a feast for the soul of wayfaring pilgrims searching for the Un-Holy Grail of seedy salvation. This pack of rouge delinquents will decapitate your senses with songs and music crafted from utter mayhem and sheer debauchery. The lucky pilgrim who ventures into the room with these deplorable angels with leave molecularly scathed, never to be integrated into normalcy again, forever changed to roam the earth in the fog of delightful Whiggery. When in Nola, seek out these degenerate scallawags and drink in the groove shadows of this notorious city of wonder as they bombard you with their infamous musical tales of the city of dreams. The Good For Nothin Band , coming to your local sleaze palace and insane asylum.

 

good for nothin

Sweet Substitute Jazz Band
May 4 @ 7:00 PM – 10:00 PM

Sweet Substitute Trad Jazz Band performs early jazz which was born in New Orleans.

The Sweet Substitute Jazz Band plays Traditional New Orleans Jazz in New Orleans.

  • Ryan Robertson – Trumpet and Vocals
  • Chad Mo Moore – Clarinet
  • Nicholas Snyder – Banjo and Vocals
  • Brandon Brunious – Bass
  • Nita Hemeter – Drums
  • Janice Medlock – Trombone, Piano and Vocals
  • Li’l Josephine – Bass
  • Bob Marquart – Trumpet and Vocals

Dysfunktional Bone
May 4 @ 10:00 PM – May 5 @ 12:00 AM

In August 2012, a new sound emerged from New Orleans, La, known as Dysfunktional Bone. Since then, Dysfunktional Bone has been playing frequently on Frenchmen St. and across southern Louisiana, wowing audiences with their high energy set. Blending a powerful horn-heavy frontline with a rocking rhythm section, Dysfunktional Bone combines Jimi Hendrix, The Beatles, the J.B. Horns, original Nola funk, and much more into one action packed set. 

Justin Pardue – trombone/vocals
Jonathan Lyons – tenor sax/vocals
Jimmie Reamey – trumpet/vocals
Pete Roze – guitar
AJ Alluli – keys
Miles Lyons – sousaphone
Brendan Bull – drums

Fiyawerx Productions presents FIYA POWA 2017 at The Maison
May 4 @ 11:45 PM – May 5 @ 5:45 AM
Fiyawerx Productions presents FIYA POWA 2017 at The Maison @ The Maison | New Orleans | LA | US

Thursday, May 4th, 2017 at 2AM *Technically Friday Morning* at The Maison

Fiyawerx Productions presents FIYA POWA 2017 featuring…

Leo Nocentelli

Ivan Neville

Stanton Moore

Tony Hall

Big Sam

Skerik

Roosevelt Collier

& Maurice Brown

May
5
Fri
Shotgun Jazz Band
May 5 @ 7:00 PM – 10:00 PM
Fest Late Night with Dirty Dozen Brass Band at The Maison
May 5 @ 9:30 PM – May 6 @ 1:00 AM
Fest Late Night with Dirty Dozen Brass Band at The Maison @ The Maison | New Orleans | LA | US

Fest Late Night featuring…

Dirty Dozen Brass Band

Friday, May 5th, 2017

9PM at The Maison on Frenchmen Street


 

Dirty Dozen Brass Band

To describe how the Dirty Dozen Brass Band has arrived at its 35th Anniversary, trumpet player Gregory Davis employs a tried-and true New Orleans-centric analogy: “It ends up being like a pot of gumbo – you drop in a little okra, drop in a little shrimp, you drop in some crabs. Before you know it, you’ve mixed in all these different ingredients and you’ve got a beautiful soup. That was our approach to music early on and it still is today.”

Baritone sax player Roger Lewis — who, like Davis, has been with the combo since its inception in 1977 — echoes that sentiment: “It’s a big old musical gumbo, and that probably made the difference, separating us from other brass bands out of New Orleans. It put a different twist on the music. We were not trying to change anything, we were just playing the music we wanted to play and not stay in one particular bag.”

An appetite for musicological adventure, a commitment to honor tradition while not being constrained by it, and a healthy sense of humor have brought the world-traveling Dirty Dozen Brass Band to this remarkable juncture in an already storied career. To celebrate its 35th, the band is releasing Twenty Dozen, the septet’s first studio release in six years. The new album, cut at the Music Shed in New Orleans, reunites the band with producer Scott Billington, who helmed DDBB’s first major-label release, Voodoo, in 1989. It’s a resolutely upbeat effort that seamlessly blends R&B, jazz, funk, Afro-Latino grooves, some Caribbean flavor, and even a Rihanna cover. Twenty Dozen mirrors in flow and feel a vibrant DDBB live set. The disc reaches an exuberant peak with a medley of New Orleans staples, including a particularly high-spirited rendering of “When the Saints Go Marching In.” The final track – or, as Lewis puts it, “the after-party” – is an audience encore favorite, the ribald “Dirty Old Man,” with Lewis doing an outstanding job in the title role. Twenty Dozen, says Lewis, is “classic Dirty Dozen. It’s got something for your mind, body, and soul. We’re gonna get you one way or another.”

Twenty Dozen is also very much a group effort, with each of the members – Davis, Lewis, tenor-sax man Kevin Harris, trumpeter Efrem Towns, sousaphonist Kirk Joseph, drummer Terence Higgins and guitarist Jake Eckert — bringing original compositions or arrangement ideas to the sessions. It kicks off with the light-hearted funk of “Tomorrow,” segues into the jazzier “Jook” then heads into the party-hearty island groove of “Best Of All.” Billington suggested DDBB cover Rihanna’s “Don’t Stop the Music,” and the group’s reinterpretation is as ingenious as it is fun. The tough, seventies-style soul of “We Gon’ Roll” supplies the most serious moment, as composer Higgins pays tribute to the indomitable nature of his fellow NOLA residents. As Davis – whose own “Git Up” is a smoking jazz workout — explains, “Just about everybody had a song or something they wanted to contribute. As we started to record the songs and listen to them, each song seemed to fit not just with the character of the individuals who wrote them but the character of the band. We are the Dirty Dozen and it’s the overall character of the band that makes the live show work –and that makes this record work. Had we planned to make a certain kind of record, it might not have come out like that. In letting the guys’ voices speak and come out on their own, the album turned out this way.”

The traditional numbers at the tail end of Twenty Dozen serve as a reminder of how the group, since the beginning, has tried to reinvigorate the standards and build a bridge between old and new. Says Davis, “Over the last few years we have been doing a medley that has included ‘Paul Barbarin’s Second Line,’ ‘E Flat Blues’ and ‘Saints.’ It had been going over so well that we thought maybe we needed to capture the spirit of what we’re doing with this medley and put it on a record. ‘Saints’ is one of the most requested songs we do and you have to face the challenge of playing that song so many times. But once you get that started and see the smiles on people’s faces and they start dancing to it, it makes you want to do it a little bit more. In the studio, I was envisioning different scenes from our audiences. I’d remember the reaction I would get attempting to get people up to dance, to do certain steps and follow me. It made it so much fun to remember the faces, the smiles, the body movements of the people. To get them up, to get them sweating — it’s always a pleasure.” Listening to this new “Saints” rendition on disc has the same effect: it’s impossible to remain in your easy chair. Davis considers this and, laughing, imagines a new opportunity for the band: ““Maybe we need to sell this as a work-out CD.”

While traditional numbers infused with a DDBB flavor have always been crowd-pleasing staples of the group’s repertoire, it’s the Dirty Dozen Brass Band’s willingness to look beyond the New Orleans songbook and find connections amongst a wider range of music that has endeared them to critics, fellow musicians and a multi-generational, global audience. They’ve been embraced enthusiastically by the jam-band followers at Bonnaroo as well as by the devotees who flock to the yearly New Orleans Jazz Fest. Acts like the Black Crowes and Widespread Panic have taken them on tour and artists from Dizzy Gillespie to Elvis Costello to Norah Jones have joined them in the studio. In the wake of Hurricane Katrina, DDBB participated in the From the Big Apple to the Big Easy benefit at New York City’s Madison Square Garden and offered its own response to the aftermath of the disaster with an acclaimed 2006 song-by-song remake of Marvin Gaye’s What’s Going On. Their music has been featured on the HBO series, Treme, named after the New Orleans mid-city neighborhood where the band had formed, and the group performed on screen with Galactic and rapper Juvenile in Season 2. New Orleans remains a wellspring of musical inspiration and DDBB is a living, breathing embodiment of the continued vitality and evolution of the sounds of the city.

But, Davis cautions, “We’ve never been the norm, even though we started out as a traditional New Orleans brass band. In the beginning we weren’t getting work of any kind, so we thought it was okay to explore other music. That allowed us as individuals to bring ourselves into the rehearsals and that’s where we started to experiment. At the time the band started, I was a student at Loyola University and we were all being introduced to other music – to jazz from the twentieth century and so on. It’s impossible to think that you can be exposed to the harmonies that Duke Ellington was making, the rhythms coming from Dizzy Gillespie or the funk being done by James Brown, and then ignore it when you’re playing New Orleans music. New Orleans music is all of that. If we had chosen to just put in the music presented to us then as traditional, it would have stunted our growth. Being more than what we heard is what the band was about. “

DDBB enjoyed the opportunity to look back with the 2011 reissue of it galvanizing 1984 debut, My Feet Can’t Fail Me Now, but the hard-working band has little time for nostalgia. For mainstays like Davis and Lewis, 35 years have passed in the blink of an eye, as Lewis, who also sits in with several other NOLA combos, acknowledges: “Check it out – I’m 70 years old, I’m the oldest dude in the band – I’m the oldest dude in everybody’s band, now that I think about it. I don’t know where the time went. I guess it’s just the music, man, you don’t be thinking about all that. I’ve been in it 35 straight years. The reason why the band stayed together for so long, despite all we’ve gone through, it’s the right chemistry. We’re trying to make it do what it do. If we have this conversation when I’m 80, we’ll still be trying to make it do what it do.”

“As we continue to do live shows,” Davis concludes, “the challenge is still going to be, how am I going to entertain these people that are in front of me tonight? You have to make that happen at the moment, and that’s what we do best.”

Worship My Organ (Late-Nite 1:30AM) ft. Marco Benevento/John Medeski/Robert Walter/Skerik/Daru Jones & DJ Logic
May 5 @ 11:30 PM – May 6 @ 5:30 AM
Worship My Organ (Late-Nite 1:30AM) ft. Marco Benevento/John Medeski/Robert Walter/Skerik/Daru Jones & DJ Logic @ The Maison | New Orleans | LA | US

BooM BooM RooM Presents 

Worship My Organ

Late Nite 1:30-5:30 AM **Technically Saturday Morning**

THREE HAMMOND B3 Organs- HISTORIC AllStar Show!

Marco Benevento- B3 & Keys/ Benevento Russo Duo

Robert Walter- B3 & Keys/ Greyboy Allstars

John Medeski- B3 & Keys/ Medeski-Martin & Wood

Skerik- Saxophone/Les Claypool

Daru Jones- Drums/Jack White

DJ Logic- Turntables/John Popper Project 

Worship My Organ will be taking place from 1:30 AM – 5:30 AM on the night of Friday May 5th. This show is a JazzFest-Late-Nite tradition, brought to you by the BooM BooM RooM presents, creating an array of sounds, that you can only catch once, as the all start line up rotates annually. This epic show always sells out, so get your tickets NOW! 

Be sure to follow @boomboomroomsf to join the Facebook event, and find out more details on special guests, ticket contests, and more!

May
6
Sat
Chance Bushman & The Ibervillianaires
May 6 @ 1:00 PM – 4:00 PM

Led by song and dance man Chance Bushman, the Ibervillianaires match tap and jazz dance with the party music of yesteryear. The band’s repertoire runs the gamut from classic New Orleans jazz to rock and roll, encompassing tight arrangements, blues-infused solos, and freewheeling collective improvisation. Consummate entertainers, the Ibervillianaires will have you singing along, bouncing out of your chair, and dancing in the street!.

Smoking Time Jazz Club
May 6 @ 7:00 PM – 10:00 PM

SMOKING TIME JAZZ CLUB IS A NEW ORLEANS BASED TRADITIONAL JAZZ BAND REVIVING THE MUSIC OF THE 1920S AND 30S FOR TODAYS LISTENERS, SWING DANCERS AND JAZZ FANS.

THE BAND WAS FORMED IN 2010 IN THE MUSICAL GUMBO THAT IS NEW ORLEANS. RIDING THE CREST OF THE FRENCHMEN STREET SWING RENAISSANCE THEY FIND JOY AND INSPIRATION FROM THE CITY AND THE MUSIC WRITTEN BY THE GREAT TURN OF THE CENTURY ARTISTS WHO MADE JAZZ THE LIVING CULTURAL LEGACY IT IS TODAY.

 

Book now!
Fest Late Night with Rebirth Brass Band + Sexual Thunder!
May 6 @ 10:00 PM

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Get down late night after Jazz Fest 2017 with Grammy Award-winning Rebirth Brass Band and local funk favorites, Sexual Thunder! at The Maison on Frenchmen Street in New Orleans.

Saturday, May 6th, 2017

Doors: 10pm

Show Time: 11pm

May
7
Sun
Swingin’ Jazz Brunch with Chance Bushman & The NOLA Jitterbugs
May 7 @ 10:00 AM – 1:00 PM

NOLA Jitterbugs is dedicated to the preservation, promotion, and (yes!) innovation of Traditional American Music and Dance.

Kristina Morales & The Bayou Shufflers
May 7 @ 1:00 PM – 4:00 PM
Loose Marbles
May 7 @ 4:00 PM – 7:00 PM
Royal Street Winding Boys
May 7 @ 7:00 PM – 10:00 PM
Higher Heights
May 7 @ 10:00 PM
May
8
Mon
Chicken & Waffles
May 8 @ 4:00 PM – 7:00 PM
Aurora Nealand & the Royal Roses
May 8 @ 7:00 PM – 10:00 PM

The Royal Roses grew out of the rich resurgence that traditional jazz is seeing in New Orleans amongst the younger generation of musicians today. Saxophonist/vocalist Aurora Nealand has been playing in various groups in New Orleans since 2005, and the Royal Roses, founded in 2010, is her first venture as a bandleader. The Royal Roses draw their repertoire heavily from Sidney Bechet, Django Reinhart and traditional jazz of New Orleans. Comprised of some of the finest young players on the New Orleans music scene today, the Royal Roses are seeking to breath new energy, arrangements and compositions into this genre of music while exploring and learning from its rich history and tradition. They‘ve performed in New Orleans at the French Quarter Festival, Satchmo Festival and Preservation Hall, as well as in NYC at Lincoln Center Out of Doors Festival. Their first album “A Tribute to Sydney Bechet: Live at Preservation Hall” was released in 2011 to national acclaim. Current members are: Aurora Nealand (vocals/saxophone), David Boswell (trumpet), Matt Bell (vocals/guitar), Bill Machow (piano), Josh Gouzy (bass), Nathan Lambertson (bass) and Paul Thibodeaux (drums).

 

RESERVE A TABLE FOR THIS SHOW!
RnR Music Group
May 8 @ 10:00 PM